MANHATTAN — Kansas producers planted 5.90 million acres of corn for all purposes, according to the USDA’s National Agricultural Statistics Service. This is up 8 percent from last year.

Of the total acres, 95 percent were planted with biotechnology varieties, down 1 percentage point from 2018. Area to be harvested for grain is estimated at 5.53 million acres, up 11 percent from a year ago.

Soybean planted acreage is estimated at 4.70 million acres, down 1 percent from last year. Of these, 95 percent were planted with genetically modified, herbicide resistant seed, unchanged from 2018. Producers expect to harvest 4.65 million acres, down 1 percent from a year ago.

Sorghum planted for all purposes is estimated at 2.65 million acres, down 5 percent from the previous year. Area to be harvested for grain is estimated at 2.45 million acres, down 8 percent from last year.

Oil sunflower planted area is estimated at 60,000 acres, up 40 percent from last year. Harvested area is estimated at 56,000 acres, up 37 percent from a year ago. Non-oil sunflower planted area is estimated at 15,000 acres, up 50 percent from the previous year. Harvested area is estimated at 14,000 acres, up 65 percent from the previous year.

Oats planted for all purposes is estimated at 135,000 acres, up 13 percent from last year. Area to be harvested for grain is estimated at 25,000 acres, up 39 percent from last year.

Barley producers planted 15,000 acres, down 12 percent from last year. Area to be harvested for grain is estimated at 9,000 acres, up 50 percent from a year ago.

Alfalfa acreage to be harvested for dry hay is estimated at 560,000 acres, down 8 percent from last year. Other hay acreage to be cut for dry hay is estimated at 1.70 million acres, down 3 percent from a year ago.

Cotton acreage planted is estimated at a record high 185,000 acres, up 12 percent from last year.

Winter wheat planted in the fall of 2018 totaled 7.10 million acres, down 8 percent from the previous year. Harvested area is expected to total 6.60 million acres, down 10 percent from last year.

Canola acres planted are 29,000, down 38 percent from last year. Area to be harvested is estimated at 25,000 acres, down 29 percent from the previous year.

NASS is the federal statistical agency responsible for producing official data about U.S. agriculture. The estimates of planted and harvested acreages are based primarily on surveys conducted during the first two weeks of June, according to the release.

Grain Stocks

Kansas corn stocks in all positions on June 1 totaled 206 million bushels, up 4 percent from 2018, according to the USDA’s National Agricultural Statistics Service.

Of the total, 45 million bushels are stored on farms, up 7 percent from a year ago. Off-farm stocks, at 161 million bushels, are up 3 percent from last year.

Wheat stored in all positions totaled 263 million bushels, down 13 percent from a year ago. On-farm stocks of 3.20 million bushels are down 29 percent from 2018, and off-farm stocks of 260 million bushels are down 13 percent from last year.

Sorghum stored in all positions totaled 79.5 million bushels, up 98 percent from 2018. On-farm stocks of 6.10 million bushels are up 85 percent from a year ago, and off-farm stocks of 73.4 million bushels are up 99 percent from last year.

Soybeans stored in all positions totaled 93.1 million bushels, up 69 percent from last year. On-farm stocks of 23.5 million bushels are up 170 percent from a year ago, and off-farm stocks, at 69.6 million bushels, are up 50 percent from 2018. Off-farm oat stocks totaled 151,000 bushels, down 4 percent from 2018.

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