100 Years Ago (1919)

Beginning Tuesday, July 1st, the 2c letter rate became effective, so now letters that formerly cost 3c an ounce and postal cards costs 2c, go through the mails at 2c and 1c, as previously to the war. Three cent postage became effective October 1, 1917, the odd cent going to the Treasury department for war purposes. The war tax stamp for parcel post remains.

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The scarcity of leather and the consequent increase in price for footwear makes any process of treatment welcome that gives added life to articles so essential. A writer in Chamber‘s Journal declares that varnishing the soles of boots and shoes make them wear four or five times as long as the soles wear without that treatment.

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Louis Kaufman, W. T. Breckenridge and Mrs. Ella Warner, were in Kansas City the fore part of the week buying goods for the dry goods department at the Economy Merc. Co. of Louisburg.

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Old papers for sale at this office, 5 cents a bundle.

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The Louisburg Herald was established July 1876, by E. F. Heisler now of Kansas City, Kansas, so with this issue it begins the Forty-third year. The paper has been in the hands of but five persons. Heisler established the plant and printed the first paper. He sold out to Robert Wright and he to R. H. Cadwalader. The present publisher bought the plant and good will from Charles E. Hinds and assumed charge on Sept. 1, 1908. The future prospects for the Herald are far better than of the past. The equipment is modern and in good condition and such that a daily paper could be produced should the conditions justify one. Miss Bernice Nesselrode is the present editor and business manager. She began the trade as a linotype operator and reporter and by hard work has published a splendid paper.

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Harry and Leo Edmiston have bought the City Laundry of F. M. Criswell in Paola and are now in charge. Mr. Criswell bought this business four year ago and did exceedingly well with it.

Nearly all the machines in the old fields have been idle on account to the drillers and helpers assisting the farmers in the harvest fields.

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Harry and Leo Edmiston have bought the City Laundry in Paola of F. M. Criswell and are now in charge. Mr. Criswell bought this business four years ago and did exceedingly well with it.

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The building committee of the Eastern Kansas Agricultural Association has begun the work of clearing the grounds for the new building, to be erected on the corner just west of the southwest corner of the square, across the street east of the Paola Lumber Co. The location is excellent and the project one of the best ever undertaken in the county.

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William Meng had been out to his farm in Richland last week cutting his wheat and Saturday was on his way to town driving his splendid new Olds Eight automobile. On the way to town he passed Isaac Jackson, a young man of Paola and accommodated him with a ride to town. He stopped his car at the corner on Peoria Street opposite J. L Lowe’s implement house and went to the implement house for parts, leaving the young man in the car. During his absence two girls came along and Isaac, fascinated with the car, and having had slight experience in driving, supposed he would take a little drive with the girls before Mr. Meng got back, and drove them to near their home in the northwestern part of town, on Gold street, and turned west on 4th street, where there is a steep hill between Gold and Iron streets. Isaac got rattled and the powerful machine bucked. The girls jumped out and Isaac started the car down the hill at a fierce speed, and applied the brake so suddenly that the car rolled over twice and turned turtle, leaving Isaac with a dislocated shoulder, a badly injured arm, and several bruises. Deck Anderson happened along about that time and brought Isaac to a doctor and informed Mr. Meng, who went out and saw the serious predicament his car was in. It was lying cross ways of the street, both front wheels were broken and the axle bent. The top and windshield were crushed, the steering wheel broken and three fenders mashed. It will cost several hundred dollars to make repairs. It was a pretty wine color new machine, and the register showing it had traveled on 1779 miles.

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The Paola Mill and Elevator Company which purchased the Hamlin Mill, is remodeling the mill throughout. New machinery is beginning to arrive and the grind will begin in a few weeks. Their elevator is in fine condition to commence receiving the new crop. Their office building is nearing completion and G. I. Protzman is there to write the checks.

75 Years Ago (1944)

Governor Schoeppel announced the appointment of Leonard McCalla of Garnett to be state printer. McCalla is the owner of the Anderson Countian. He has been in the publishing business in Kansas all his life.

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J. Brice Bailey has purchased the garage property he has occupied for his Plymouth-DeSoto agency on South Pearl Street from Mrs. Leila Taylor of Kansas City for $5,000. Mr. Bailey has the garage operating again although he will continue for a time his executive position at the Sunflower Ordinance works.

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“Synthetic rubber automobile tires are now entirely out of the novelty class and their adequacy has been established on actual use on American cars.” That statement was made here today by J. B. Carpenter, local B. F. Goodrich dealer, in commenting on the announcement by his company that all synthetic Silverton tires on consumers’ automobiles have run more than three billion miles.

50 Years Ago (1969)

W. H. Ennis is the new president of the Bank of Louisburg. The announcement was made by E. V. Perdue, who will become chairman of the board. Mr. Ennis, Bud as he is generally known, was senior Vice President of the Union National bank in Kansas City before joining the bank of Louisburg. He has an extensive background in business in addition to his banking experience. Mr. L. G. Wilson will continue as Cashier and loan office for the bank and Mr. M. L. Lee will continue as Assistant Cashier.

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In a recent Kansas State Skeet shoot at the Winchester Gun club, Wayne Town of Bucyrus scored a sweep in the junior division to become the Kansas State Junior Champion. Wayne is the son of Mr. and Mrs. John. W. Town and will be a junior at Louisburg High School.

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For the first time since 1860 Miami County will have no county superintendent of schools, beginning July 1. On that date, by state law this office will cease to exist through the unification program in Kansas. The last person elected to serve in the office is Mrs. Clara McClintock Dickerson, who was elected in 1964. To Mrs. Dickerson fell the task of closing the office and disposing of the multitude of records covering the history of Miami county schools for 109 years. The records will be stored in the register of deeds office.

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Bill Hauldren is doing a little “deviling” around the Paola newspaper plant this summer making the third generation of the Hauldren family to be exposed to the printing trade . . . His father, Lester, is superintendent of the Paola newspaper and printing plant, and his grandfather, the late William Lester Hauldren, edited and published several Kansas newspapers including the Havensville Review.

25 Years Ago (1994)

Ann Davis was installed as president of the Paola Rotary Club at the regular meeting Thursday. Davis was the first woman inducted into the Paola Rotary Club and now is the first woman to serve as president of that civic organization. She takes the place of Herschel George, who served as president for the 1993-94 Rotary year. Also installed were Mary Ellen Gilchrist as vice president and Kathy Minden as treasurer. Minden replaces Mark Fuchs as treasurer. Fuchs asked not be re-elected. Bob Harrington continues as secretary. Ernie Pratt replaces Dale Everhart on the board of directors.

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Impact Designs in Louisburg is growing faster than it can hire people to work. The embroidery plant currently employs 20 people. The company started in April with only six people and will continue to take more job applications and more work orders.

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Jim Crowl has returned to the insurance business. He is the new agent for Farmers Insurance Group Companies and opened his office for business Monday at 820 N. Pearl St., Paola. Crowl was the Miami County agent for Farm Bureau for 27 years before leaving that company May 18. Crowl’s daughter, Dianne Crowl-Ventura will soon open an office in Osawatomie for Farmers. She has about seven years experience in the insurance business.

Editor and Publisher Brian McCauley can be reached at (913) 294-2311 or brian.mccauley@miconews.com.

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