Miami County Time Capsule

Miami County Time Capsule

100 Years Ago (1920)

With this issue (April 30, 1920) The Miami Republican passes into a new and better management, the paper having been sold to Drew McLaughlin of Hiawatha, Kansas. Mr. McLaughlin is one of the most capable, widely known and successful newspaper men of northeastern Kansas. He not only literally grew up in the business, but comes of a family of newspaper men, being related to Major Charles Brown of the Horton Commercial and Will Beck of the Holton Recorder. He has a record for manly courage, unfailing integrity and unimpeachable honesty, in whose hands we are pleased to trust the future destiny of the Republican. Mrs. McLaughlin, the family’s better half, is a cultured, refined lady, and will be a valuable acquisition to this community. Our career as a printer began away back in June, 1875, when just out of the common schools, a little more than five years after the Greason family landed in Paola from Cumberland Co, Penna. The Republican, which was established in 1866 by Mitchell & McReynolds, was owned in 1875 by Gen. John H. Rice, James D., Owen H. and Thos. O. Greason, the Greason brothers selling out to Gen. Rice about 1877. The same year we (W. D. Greason) went to the Western Spirit, then published by Capt. Leslie J. Perry, who sold that paper a year later to Carroll, Clarke & Highley. In 1880 we bought the interest of W. M. Clarke. Later B. J. Sheridan bought the interest of Capt. Carroll and about a year later we sold our third interest to Sheridan & Highley. About 1880 Capt. Perry and R. P. Rice bought the Republican and in 1882 we bought the half interest of Mr. Rice, and the firm of Perry & Greason published the Republican until 1885, when we bought Capt. Perry’s interest and we have published the paper since that time — thirty-five years, making a period of forty-five years in all since we first went into the office as an apprentice in 1875.

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Downs, Peterson & Miller, insurance agents, announce that they will open their new suite of offices, southwest corner of the square, Saturday, April 30. This is one of the most attractive office buildings in the city. The entire front is plate glass and the interior is artistically decorated, the color scheme being orange, old ivory and white. The lobby is separate from the office proper by a desk-top marble railing four feet high, whole the furniture, fixtures and word work are finished in golden oak.

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Over a ton of dandelions were dug as a result of the dandelion digging contest, open the past week to school children, and sponsored by the civic committee of the commercial club, woman’s federations clubs and the Rotary club. One ton and fifty pounds of dandelions were dug and sacked by thirteen school children. The dandelions were taken to the city hall and were weighed in the presence of street commissioner Sam Harlow on the city scales. Alvin Meissler received the first prize of $5, his dandelions weighing 410 pounds. James and George Gilmore won the second prize of $2, their sacks weighing 390 pounds.—Independence Reporter.

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J. C. Tibbetts, former foreman on the Neodesha Sun, a daily paper published in Neodesha, Kansas, and Doc Conner of Osawatomie spent Sunday in Louisburg with relatives. Tibbetts is at Osawatomie where he is employed as operator on the Osawatomie Graphic. He was making good at Neodesha, but was anxious to be nearer to Louisburg on account of his family. Conner is city mail carrier in Osawatomie.

75 Years Ago (1945)

Mr. and Mrs. Don L. Brown, who operate Brownie’s Café (bus station), formerly Penneybaker’s Café, have purchased the Country Club Café in the Phillips building on Hi-way 69 in East Louisburg. They will continue to operate both cafes.

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The Sun Theatre in Louisburg was packed to full capacity last night with people eager to see the talkie film demonstrating the proper methods of preparing meats and vegetables frozen locker systems. Mrs. Letha Strong, home economics department for Kansas City Power and Light Co. and Roy Masterson, owner of the Louisburg locker system, sponsored the event.

50 Years Ago (1970)

The new Osawatomie High School was hit by a fire bomb about 9 p.m. April 22. Two Osawatomie boys, 15 and 16 years of age were taken into custody about 1 a.m. and two others 15 and 16 were apprehended at noon. The fire-bomb, a glass bottle containing some type of flammable liquid, was thrown against the north double doors of the high school building. Damage to the doors appeared to be minor. The new school opened its doors March 23.

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It’s grand opening time at Sutherland’s Food Mart and Home Center at their new store in Paola. Mr. and Mrs. Rex Sutherland invite you to visit the new store and view the many features it offers.

25 Years Ago (1995)

Ralph I. Platz, 76, longtime Osawatomie resident and retired businessman and civic leader, died April 26, 1995, at Olathe Medical Center. He married Pearl Shultz in 1944. Ralph became a partner with his father-in-law in the grocery business, Ralph and Pearl became full owners of the business in 1955, and the store was named Ralph’s Food Center. The business closed in 1985 when they retired. Ralph was past board member of the Osawatomie Chamber of Commerce, past president and member of the Osawatomie Lions Club for 37 years, served on the Osawatomie City Commission, member of Hanlin-Kelly VFW, and member of American Legion.

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After a lengthy public debate the Miami County commissioners unanimously approved a conditional use permit that will allow the Princess Maria Bingo project in southeastern Miami County to proceed.

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