Miami County Time Capsule

Miami County Time Capsule

100 Years Ago (1920)

It is no unusual thing to meet a water wagon on the road these days, as many farmers are compelled to haul stock water as well as wash water three to five miles. A number of the producing springs have been dry since late summer and the water scarcity in Louisburg is becoming more noticeable each week. In town the cisterns are playing out owing to the fact that there have been no rains of the filling kind for six months. However, there are a number of springs within 3 miles of Louisburg that have never been known to go dry and as yet show no effects of the drought.

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Louisburg people are well pleased with the six mile stretch of oiled roads which the county commissioners had oiled last October, along the “Short Line” through Louisburg. The county oiled five miles of the road and Louisburg city bought and had a car load spread making a total of six miles. The County Commissioners ought to oil this road all the way through Miami County.

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The people of Louisburg will have the opportunity to vote on the proposition of buying the Electric Light & Power Company at a special election Jan. 2, 1920. Should the people approve the city will issue $6,500 bonds to buy and operate the plant. Dr. J. V. Ferrel, owner of the plant and holder of a franchise, has notified the city council that he would operate the plant no longer a period than was required to give the citizens an opportunity to express their desires by a vote. It is his intention to cut off the service and sell the equipment at a private sale. This would mean Louisburg would again be in the dark.

75 Years Ago (1945)

Miss Gertrude Hill, commercial teacher at the Paola High School, observed her 50th anniversary as a teacher in the Paola public schools Wednesday.

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The official statement of the Miami County National Bank at the close of business Dec. 31, showed deposits of $4,036,871.48, by far the largest in the history of the county. Bankers in other communities marvel over such a large financial institution in a town the size of Paola. The deposits exceed those of most banks in cities of the 10,000 class.

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Farmers who need lumber for emergency maintenance and repair of farm dwellings may now apply to the War Food Administration for preference ratings instead of to the War Production Board Field offices. WPB’s office of civilian requirements has transferred its allotment of lumber to WFA for the first quarter of 1945 to provide lumber for emergency maintenance and repair of farm dwellings.

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Frank Sinatra, the frail looking youth who has been crooning for a vitamin pill concern over the radio these many weeks, is being given the brush-off by his sponsor. One look at Frank would raise a question of doubt in the mind of any neutral observer about the potency of vitamins. But Frank must have something on the ball, for he’s at the top of his profession, and nobody gets that high through accident.

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Less than one fourth of the motor trucks estimated as needed to meet essential war and civilian transportation requirements during 1945 will be produced and distributed to commercial operators the Office of Defense Transportation announced. Increased demands by the armed services for all types of motor transport was given as the chief reason for the severe reduction in supply.

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Mrs. Minnie Beers, Lawrence probably holds the record for supplying the largest family of war workers to the Sunflower Ordinance Works, the vital rocket powder plant near DeSoto. At the present time, besides herself, there are seven sons, one daughter, one son-in-law, two daughters-in-law, and one granddaughter working on the production lines.

50 Years Ago (1970)

In the twenties it wasn’t uncommon for some of the older high school boys to ice skate to Osawatomie from Paola by skating down Bull Creek to the river and then going upstream on the Marais des Cygnes to Osawatomie. Not many times in the past twenty years has such a trip been possible because for some reason or other there is not as much hard ice on the streams these days as there was in the past.

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During the past 10 years Paola has lost four farm implement establishments, three restaurants, a clothing store, one automotive service station and two poultry houses. On the other hand it has gained one women’s ready to wear shop, a children’s ready to wear shop, a tire and appliance firm, a doughnut shop, a liquor store, a new lumber yard and a new dentist.

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Bob Dempsey reports that he has had a multitude of inquiries regarding his home cure for arthritis and says that cream of tarter is hard to get at super markets now.

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Ralph E. Waggoner, Osawatomie, has purchased the Doug Hagadorn Insurance Agency in Osawatomie, effective January 1. Hagadorn, who has operated the agency since the early ‘30s will retire.

25 Years Ago (1995)

He will be one of the youngest members of the U.S. House of Representatives when he is sworn in Jan. 4 as a member of that body. Sam Brownback, who grew up near Parker in Linn County, said he never specifically had his sights on the post in Washington for the second district. The Kansan said his main efforts would be to cut back the federal government and to reform Congress.

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The same restaurant with a different name, Fat Charlies, opened in the Eastgate Motel complex Sunday morning. It had been operated as JC’s Restaurant and Lounge by Judy and Charles York. Charles and Ellen Barrett are the new operators of the restaurant.

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Dale Dollar and Lois Dalton are the new owners of Mitchell Office Supply at 114 S. Silver in Paola. They plan many changes to the traditional office supply store. Dale Mitchell retired in November, after owning Mitchell Office Supply for nearly 40 years. Mitchell built a reputation for repair service. He could fix just about any typewriter and other pieces of office equipment.

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Construction on a $1.49 million modification of Garnett’s water treatment plant was completed last month. The plant’s capacity was expanded from about 900,000 gallons a day to 1.3 million gallons.

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