Miami County Time Capsule

Miami County Time Capsule

100 Years Ago (1920)

That Shorthorn sale C. S. Nevius & Sons will hold at the farm one mile south of Chiles of Tuesday means much to Miami County. Mr. Nevius has pioneered as a raiser of purebred stock. He has developed a fine herd of purebred stock. Other farmers in this and nearby counties will profit because of his foresight.

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Gussie Kallio, the invincible, won the wrestling match with Ed Wirth at the American Legion Hall Friday night, getting the first fall in 22 minutes and second in 15 minutes. Wirth, who formerly lived at La Cygne, is a good wrestler, but he is hardly in the same class with Kallio. In fact Kallio seems to be in a class by himself and is a 100 per cent winner.

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L. T. Bradbury, while motoring in the country Tuesday reports having seen some road work in progress which appealed to him as practical and commendable. Henry Dageford and F. H. Prothe, two progressive farmers of the Block neighborhood, were following up the road plane with large harrows, leveling the surface, filling ruts and breaking clods. These men were neglecting their own work in order to assist in bettering the highway. This is a move in the right direction and if every farmer within a 20 mile radius of Paola would devote a certain amount of labor in keeping up the road fronting their premises, the condition of the highways would be benefitted 50 per cent.

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A big exhaust fan recently installed in the rear of Carey Café disperses delightful breezes and makes that popular restaurant a cool, delightful retreat.

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Henry Debrick and Lon Schultz of Osage Twp, south of Henson Station, are getting ready for the promising big oats crop and the fairly promising wheat crop in that neighborhood. Tuesday they received a No. 3252 New Rumley separator and a 20-40 oil burner engine. The increasing use of the tractor in farming operations is a noticeable feature to the casual observer as he drives through the country this spring.

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Bert Wright, accompanied by Guy Doty and Tom Oyster left Tuesday for the Buick factory at Flint, Mich., to drive back three new autos. On a former trip the dealer ahead of Bert drew No. 13 and rejected it. Bert isn’t superstitious and took the number, getting his allotment of cars earlier. The man who believed in bad luck got stranded in the mud on the way home and had to leave his cars. Bert and those in his party got to Paola without much grief.

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It seems useless to have two depots in Paola. The Missouri Pacific tracks pass close to the Frisco depot. There should be a union station — a modern structure. Until it is obtained the Frisco and Katy companies could show an accommodating spirit by putting in more lights at the depot. Passengers discharged from toward the rear of long northbound trains late at night have to walk a considerable distance in the dark past the water tank and freight house. There should be more lights at the depot.

75 Years Ago (1945)

The state started on Friday spreading 400 yards of gravel per mile on K-68 highway, across the entire county. Rock is being obtained from the Hays quarry west of Paola.

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A traffic trap has been designated and marked to slow traffic on US-69 to 30 miles per hour past the Panhandle station. The purpose is to protect the trucks and cars of the workers constructing the sixth unit for the station. The slow order will be enforced until the unit is completed.

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Few people realize that Louisburg has a machine shop producing important parts for planes for the war. W. L. Thompson’s shop has lathed and finished more than 25,000 indicator barrels with plungers for glider tow release. He has produced these parts since 1942.

50 Years Ago (1970)

The old Elms Hotel in Paola will be burned by volunteer firemen for the Paola fire department. The old building is located on West Peoria near the railroad tracks.

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The Paola Swimming Pool opens for the season Friday, May 29. Mr. and Mrs. Danny Wilson, who operate the pool, have been hard at work readying the pool for opening. The Plamart will hold a Sunrise dance at 2 a.m. on Sunday and that is expected to draw dancers from far and wide.

With this issue the Western Spirit embarks on its 100th year of publication as a country weekly. It was started June 7, 1871, and the first few issues were “the Kansas Spirit.” Because there was a little known paper in Lawrence with the same name, “Western” was substituted for “Kansas” to sidestep the conflict. The paper was founded by Captain Leslie Jay Perry and became authority on Republican politics, news matter and general literature in its second year. In June, 1878, Perry sold the paper to Thomas M. Carroll, who changed the politics to Democratic. A year and a half later Bernard James Sheridan bought Carroll’s interest to become editor in January, 1880. From then until his death in March, 1938, Mr. Sheridan and his son, Jno. W. Sheridan, were associated in publishing the weekly. Following Mr. Sheridan’s death his heirs continued to publish the paper several years. Later the late B. L. Sheridan bought their interests. In 1951 Mr. Sheridan, who was a nephew of Bernard James Sheridan, sold the paper to L. M. Schwartz, Paola banker. The paper continued to be Democratic in politics through the changing ownerships. On Oct. 1, 1956, The Western Spirit and The Miami Republican, Paola’s other weekly publication, were merged into The Miami County Publishing Company, Inc., and since then The Spirit has been published on Monday as part of the semi-weekly operation. In the beginning the paper carried a Friday date and later was changed to Thursday before the merger.

George Diehm has been offered a contract to serve as superintendent of Unified School District No. 368, effective Sept. 1. Diehm is presently serving as business manager of the district.

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Tom Auten is peddling plexoglass bug catchers that fit on to the front of the hood of automobiles. The shield stops the bugs dead and keeps them from splattering the windshields.

25 Years Ago (1995)

The Challenger steam locomotive chugged its way into Parker Friday. The train went through Miami County ahead of schedule Friday morning as part of a 4,000-mile, eight-state-tour that began in Cheyenne, Wyo., and will end there June 24. The Challenger is the world’s largest operating steam locomotive. It was restored by Union Pacific Railroad employees.

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More than 3,600 people have applied to fill about 1,000 jobs at the Wal-Mart distribution center under construction east of Ottawa. Construction of the distribution center is expected to be completed soon. Shipment of merchandise from the center is scheduled to begin Sept. 12.

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The Linn County Bank will celebrate its 125th anniversary on Saturday in La Cygne. Established in 1870 as the Farmer’s Savings Bank in La Cygne by S. D. Cady, the bank assumed it current name after Cady sold his stock in 1886. The bank is considered by state historians to be the oldest continually operating bank in eastern Kansas, despite its name change. Donald Pease has been bank president since 1975.

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Plans to build a new grocery store and shopping center in Osawatomie quietly ceased. An Overland Park development company, High Plains Land Co., discussed the possibility last year of building a 25,000- to 35,000-square –foot national chain grocery store as the center piece of a retail shopping center on and around the property where the Trojan Lanes bowling alley now stands. Part of the land behind the bowling alley was owned by the city and sold to the developer for $1 plus a guarantee to hire at least four local residents for full-time positions. One stipulation of the sale was that work at the site begin by April 1 of this year, which did not happen.

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Painstaking restoration plans for two buildings on Paola’s Square owned by entrepreneur Del Dunmire have once again added scaffolding to the downtown view. Dunmire, who lives in Harrisonville, Mo., said the total restoration project on the buildings will cost about $300,000. Dunmire bought the building five year ago when Fickel Furniture was having a going-out-of-business sale. He said when he realized the building had possibilities, he asked the manager if the building was for sale and offered him cash that day. “I wasn’t planning to buy a building that day,” he said. “I just went in to look around at the sale.”

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